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Category: New to Islam

New to Islam

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I must say you are doing an excellent job answering questions.
My question is regarding Surah 38 verse 72. It states: {So when I have made him complete and breathed into him of My spirit, then fall down making obeisance to him.}

From that verse one might conclude that God is/has a spirit. Does He? I would appreciate if you could try and explain what God really is in Islam. I would also appreciate if you would clarify to me if He is/has a spirit or not and also if He put part of His spirit in Man. That is if He is a spirit. Thank you for your time..

  • jonathan asked 3 years ago
  • last active 3 years ago
0 votes
512 views

Hello, In this answer: What is the Holy Spirit? it is proffered that Gabriel and the Holy Spirit are one in the same. However, while including some of Luke chapter 1, the article quite explicitly excluded this most-relevant verse (the material within the []s is my addition) – Luk 1:35 (YLT): “And the messenger [Gabriel] answering said to her: ‘The Holy Spirit shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee, therefore also the holy-begotten thing shall be called Son of God;” Clarification on the nature of this omission would be nice. Thank you for your time. May the truth flow… One Love, David.

  • mariam asked 3 years ago
  • last active 2 years ago
0 votes
0 answers
568 views

Hello, In this answer: What is the Holy Spirit? it is proffered that Gabriel and the Holy Spirit are one in the same. However, while including some of Luke chapter 1, the article quite explicitly excluded this most-relevant verse (the material within the []s is my addition) – Luk 1:35 (YLT): “And the messenger [Gabriel] answering said to her: ‘The Holy Spirit shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee, therefore also the holy-begotten thing shall be called Son of God;” Clarification on the nature of this omission would be nice. Thank you for your time. May the truth flow… One Love, David.

0 votes
545 views

My question concerns the shahada. Depending on the nationality of the Muslims, I am receiving conflicting views on how this should be performed. I have been told I need not go to the mosque and do not even need a witness as it’s between Allah and myself. Some tell me only men can witness, others say at least 4 women. Can you please clarify ? Also I would like to know what the point is of wearing hijab for prayer in private? Thank you for your kind advice.

  • jonathan asked 3 years ago
  • last active 3 years ago
0 votes
545 views

I am a new believer and student of Islam. Although the thought of my journey to Makkah is very premature, because I still have so much to learn, I am curious to know if one must be Muslim for a certain amount of time before making the journey. Also, how does one, especially someone who was not born into the faith, prove they are Muslim so that they are allowed to make the journey? Thank you for your time and consideration. Warmest Regards.

0 votes
0 answers
369 views

As-salamu alaykum, I would like to know as much as possible about Prophet Ishmael (Ismail, peace be upon him): about his birth, life and death; whether he is mentioned in the Bible; what his relationship to his brother Isaac was; whether they spoke the same language and so on and so forth… all possible details. And I will be very thankful to you. May God bless you!

0 votes
0 answers
422 views

I am a Catholic Christian and I see that you might have some misconceptions about our faith. For example, you imply that Christians worship or pray to statues, icons, and symbols. This is most definitely not true for any Christian. Icons and symbols are strictly reminders of what they stand for. One for example, does not pray to a statue of Jesus, but uses the statue as a reminder of Jesus Christ, who he is praying to. And your interpretation of the Blessed Trinity seems to be that we worship three distinct gods. Contrary to this idea, we worship only one God.

0 votes
580 views

Thank you for your very informative site. As a high school history teacher, it serves an invaluable source of accurate information about Islam and the Islamic world. My question regards the person of the Virgin Mary in Islamic teaching. I have read that in many Islamic nations – Iraq and Syria mostly – Mary has a prominent place within the hearts of Muslims. Is this the case? If so, how and what are the Islamic theological foundations for this role vis a vis Christianity? Thank you in advance for your response.

  • jonathan asked 3 years ago
  • last active 3 years ago
0 votes
487 views

How do Muslims make sure that their children [future generations] continue to believe in what they believe in?

  • jonathan asked 3 years ago
  • last active 3 years ago
0 votes
412 views

I was very pleased to find this website, as it answers many questions that non-Muslims may have about various points. After reading a lot, it becomes apparent to me that Islam or the current interpretation of Islam leaves almost every question open ended without a conclusion. It also appears that almost any murderous crime by Muslims may be justified by some act against them. While the Muslim community continues to moan about their religion being looked upon in a negative light, it should not be surprising why this is happening, considering the atrocious crimes currently being perpetrated by Muslims around the world. In fact, what appears to be a very splintered religion, to the non-Muslim, it would appear that the Qur’an and all teachings of Islam are more or less up to many interpretations, hence permitting the cancerous growth of terrorist organizations. I would really appreciate receiving some comments that will help me and other non-Muslims understand the minds of a religion that complains on one hand of being misunderstood and even attacked, while refusing to condemn the actual aggressors of these crimes openly. Thank you for listening and I look forward to your reply.

  • jonathan asked 3 years ago
  • last active 3 years ago
0 votes
512 views

I am a Christian who is very interested in Islam. Although it is said that Islam denies the Incarnation of God in Jesus, there are many modern theologians—Tillich, Rahner, Kung—whose understanding of the Incarnation would seem, at face value, to be compatible with the Muslim understanding of Jesus. Muslims always seem to talk about fundamentalist Christian ideas, but I’ve never seen a Muslim addressing more “liberal” theologians. Would modern formulations of the Incarnation, such as those proposed by Marcus Borg or Bishop John Spong, be compatible with Islam?

Is not the Qur’an itself an “incarnation of the Word”? And when the Qur’an calls Jesus a “word” and “spirit” of God, isn’t that suggesting that Jesus is of the same divine essence of God, in that God’s Word and Spirit must partake of God’s divinity?

And, remember, there is no place in the Qur’an which calls Jesus merely human—he is given titles which place him above other prophets, not the least of which is his virgin birth—he comes directly from God. I’m not sure that I would need to change any of my current beliefs to become a Muslim. Indeed, I believe I am surrendered to God already, and that my ideas of Incarnation are in no way shirk, but are compatible with both the Qur’an and the Gospel. So, I want to ask what you think.

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